Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

“Obsene, even pornographic”

Saturday, March 2nd, 2019

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It would seem that the Florida Tea Party is trying to get ALMOST PERFECT removed from the local high school libraries. I’m just honored to be on the same list as their other targets:

  • Almost Perfect by Brian Katcher (available at Forest and Lake Weir high schools)
  • Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt (available at all Marion high schools)
  • The Women of Brewster’s Place by Gloria Naylor (available at North Marion High)
  • The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison (available at all Marion high schools)
  • Beloved by Toni Morrison: (available at all Marion high schools)
  • The Truth About Alice by Jennifer Mathieu(available at all Marion high schools)
  • Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina Garcia (available at Dunnellon High School and West Port High School)
  • Killing Mr. Griffin by Lois Duncan (available at all Marion high schools except Dunnellon)
  • The Awakening by Kate Chopin: (available at all Marion high schools)
  • Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess(available at Dunnellon, North Marion, Vanguard and West Port high schools)

South Carolina Young Adult Book Award

Saturday, February 9th, 2019

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DEACON LOCKE was nominated for the 2019-2020 South Carolina Young Adult Book Award!

Local Authors’ Night, Skylark Bookshop

Monday, November 26th, 2018

Stop by Skylark Bookshop in Columbia, MO, on November 28, from 6:00-7:30 to meet me and three other local authors!

Saturday Writers, October 9

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

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Join me on October 9th in my home town of St. Peters for an evening of discussion, reading, and no rules boxing. Just follow this link.

Deacon Locke now available in German

Saturday, February 10th, 2018

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That’s ‘Me, Jean, and the night of my life.’

New York Comic Con

Sunday, September 10th, 2017

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Publishers Weekly review of DEACON LOCKE

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

Title aside, Katcher’s multifaceted novel is about more than a school dance, delving into discrimination, dementia, and the perils of online fame. Deacon Locke, who has never gone on a date or been kissed, waits too long to ask out potential prom dates, so he opts to take Jean, his grandmother and primary parental figure, since she missed her own prom decades ago. Deacon’s classmates find his decision adorable, and video clips of him and Jean dancing at prom go viral. Meanwhile, Deacon summons the courage to ask out Soraya, a Muslim dance instructor he meets while taking lessons with Jean, and soon has his first girlfriend. Amid the level of small-time celebrity Deacon achieves because of the video (including agreeing to participate in a Dancing with the Stars–type show after graduation), Katcher (The Improbable Theory of Ana and Zak) explores the pitfalls of Internet notoriety and the vicious, sometimes racist commentary that can come with it—with Soraya caught in the crossfire. Although the story looks directly at some of humanity’s uglier tendencies, Deacon’s entertaining commentary keeps the overall tone thoughtful, upbeat and hopeful. Ages 13–up.

Deacon Locke release day!

Monday, May 8th, 2017

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Hope you remembered to ask for the day off!

VOYA review of DEACON LOCKE

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

Deacon Locke is a sweet, very tall, socially awkward, eighteen-year-old who lives with his technophobe grandmother after years of constantly moving as his dad fled from one shady deal to another. In a last-ditch attempt to experience a normal high school rite of passage, Deacon takes his best friend to prom—that she is also his grandmother seems almost beside the point, at least until videos of them together at the prom go viral. Deacon suddenly finds himself having to navigate instant fame while simultaneously juggling first love and his worries about his grandmother’s increasing forgetfulness.
Deacon is a likeable narrator, full of self-deprecating humor. Pre-prom, Deacon is improbably old-fashioned with his lack of a cell phone, social media accounts, and Internet access. He believes (erroneously) that he has no friends outside of his grandmother. He is endearingly awkward as he takes ballroom dance classes at the YMCA with his grandmother and falls for the Lebanese instructor, Soraya, whom he begins to date. Post-prom, Deacon becomes a social media and reality TV star. At first he enjoys the attention, but he soon discovers the dark side of instant celebrity, especially as he learns of his grandmother’s dementia and the social media backlash directed at Soraya. This initially humorous coming-of-age story has a guy-friendly romance but deals with some serious issues in the second half, which darkens the tone somewhat.—Elizabeth Matson.

Great DEACON LOCKE review from Booklist

Monday, April 10th, 2017
Deacon Locke Went to Prom
Almost seven feet tall and terminally awkward, Deacon has never been to a school dance. But the senior prom is coming up, and he reluctantly decides to go. Unfortunately, the girl he wants to ask is already taken. Bummer. But then he has a brainstorm: he’ll invite his best friend—wait for it—his grandmother Jean! Happily, she says yes, and Deacon agrees to take dance lessons, where he meets the beautiful Soraya, whom he begins to date. But first Deacon and Jean go to the prom, and videos are taken of them dancing and posted on the Internet. The clips go viral, and suddenly Deacon and Jean are famous. Deacon is even invited to become a contestant on TV’s Celebrity Dance-Off. Happy days? Maybe. Yes, Deacon and Soraya are dating, but Jean seems to be losing her memory. And fame has a dark side. How will Deacon handle all of this? Readers will care about the answer because Deacon is an appealing, empathetic character, and Katcher’s story is always compelling. Shall we dance?
— Michael Cart